Lux prima (John Stainer)

From ChoralWiki
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Music files

L E G E N D Disclaimer How to download
ICON SOURCE
Icon_pdf.gif Pdf
Icon_snd.gif Midi
MusicXML.png MusicXML
Nwc.png Noteworthy
Sibelius.png Sibelius
File details.gif File details
Question.gif Help
  • (Posted 2007-12-02)  CPDL #15584:            (Sibelius 4)
Editor: John Henry Fowler (submitted 2007-12-02).   Score information: A4, 1 page, 25 kB   Copyright: Public Domain
Edition notes: Based on the edition from the Cyber Hymnal™

General Information

Title: Lux prima
Composer: John Stainer

Number of voices: 4vv   Voicing: SATB
Genre: SacredHymn   Meter: 8 12. 8 11

Language: English
Instruments: Keyboard

First published: Tune: Lux Prima, John Stainer, 1872; Lyrics: Friedrich Rudolf Ludwig Freiherr von Canitz, 1700 (Seele du musst munter werden); translated from German to English by Henry J. Buckoll, 1838.

Description:

External websites:

Original text and translations

English.png English text

1.
Come, my soul, thou must be waking;
Now is breaking over the earth another day;
Come to Him Who made this splendor;
See thou render all thy feeble powers can pay.

2.
Thou, too, hail the light returning
Ready burning be the incense of thy powers;
For the night is safely ended,
God hath tended with His care thy helpless hours.

3.
Pray that He may prosper ever
Each endeavor when thine aim is good and true;
But that He may ever thwart thee,
And convert thee, when thou evil wouldst pursue.

4.
Think that He thy ways beholdeth;
He unfoldeth every fault that lurks within;
He the hidden shame glossed over
Can discover, and discern each deed of sin.

5.
Mayest thou on life’s last morrow,
Free from sorrow, pass away in slumber sweet:
And, released from death’s dark sadness,
Rise in gladness that far brighter Sun to greet.

6.
Only God’s free gifts abuse not,
Light refuse not, but His Spirit’s voice obey;
Thou with Him shalt dwell, beholding
Light enfolding all things in unclouded day.

Lyrics: Friedrich Rudolf Ludwig Freiherr von Canitz, 1700 (Seele du musst munter werden); translated from German to English by Henry J. Buckoll, 1838.