Quanto sia liet' il giorno (Philippe Verdelot)

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Editor: Allen Garvin (submitted 2023-01-14).   Score information: Letter, 3 pages, 73 kB   Copyright: CC BY NC
Edition notes:
  • (Posted 2017-02-24)  CPDL #43276:         
Editor: James Gibb (submitted 2017-02-24).   Score information: A4, 3 pages, 49 kB   Copyright: CPDL
Edition notes: Reformatting of #16152, with Tenor at the correct pitch. Musica ficta are editorial.
  • (Posted 2008-02-19)  CPDL #16152:         
Editor: Brian Russell (submitted 2008-02-19).   Score information: Letter, 3 pages, 44 kB   Copyright: CPDL
Edition notes:
Error.gif Possible error(s) identified. See the discussion page for full description.
  • (Posted 2004-07-14)  CPDL #07594:        (Finale 2000)
Editor: Sabine Cassola (submitted 2004-07-14).   Score information: A4, 2 pages, 108 kB   Copyright: CPDL
Edition notes:

General Information

Title: Quanto sia liet' il giorno
Composer: Philippe Verdelot
Lyricist: Niccolò Machiavelli

Number of voices: 4vv   Voicing: SATB
Genre: SecularMadrigal

Language: Italian
Instruments: A cappella

First published: 1533 in Il primo libro de madrigali, no. 1
    2nd published: 1540 in Tutti li madrigali del primo et secondo libro a quatro voci, Edition 1, no. 21
Description: 

External websites:

Original text and translations

Italian.png Italian text

Quanto sia lieto il giorno
nel qual le cose antiche
son or da voi dimostra e celebrate:
Si vede perché intorno,
tutte le genti amiche
si son' in questa parte radunate:
noi che la nostra etate
ne' boschi, e nelle selve consumiamo
venuti ancor qui siamo
io ninfa e noi pastori
e giam cantando insieme i nostri amori.

English.png English translation

How happy is the day
in which ancient things
are now by you shown and celebrated:
One sees because around us,
all friendly people
are assembled here:
We who spend our lives
in these woodlands and groves,
have also come here,
I, nymph, and we, shepherds,
and we sing together of our loves.

Translation by Allen Garvin