Difference between revisions of "Cristóbal de Morales"

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==Publications==
 
==Publications==
 
* ''[[Moralis Hispani]]'' 1543
 
* ''[[Moralis Hispani]]'' 1543
* {{NoCo|Missarum, Liber primus}} & secundus, both 1544
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* {{NoCo|Missarum, Liber primus}} 1544
* {{NoCo|Magnificat omnitonum|Magnificat omnitonum cum quator vocibus}} 1545  
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* {{NoCo|Missarum, Liber secundus}} 1544
 
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* {{NoCo|Magnificat omnitonum|Magnificat omnitonum cum quator vocibus}} 1545
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** not to be confused with ''Magnificat cum quatuor vocibus Moralis Hispani, aliorumque authorum'' 1542, with only 4 by Morales
 
B. Nelson & O. Rees (eds), ''Cristóbal de Morales: Sources, Influences, Reception'' (Woodbridge, 2007)
 
B. Nelson & O. Rees (eds), ''Cristóbal de Morales: Sources, Influences, Reception'' (Woodbridge, 2007)
  

Latest revision as of 15:38, 9 May 2021

Aliases: Christophorus Morales Hyspalensis

Cristóbal de Morales

Life

Born: c. 1500?

Died: Fall 1553

Biography Morales was recorded as an organist in Seville in 1522 and his later motet Clamabat autem mulier alludes to the setting by Pedro de Escobar, master of the boys there 1507-1514. He became maestro de capilla at Avila 1526-1531 and joined the papal chapel 1535-1545. He served 1545-1547 at Toledo before resigning because of illness; his reapplication for the post is dated 4 September 1553 but by 7 October he was already dead.

View the Wikipedia article on Cristóbal de Morales.

List of choral works

Canticles

Masses

Other Sacred Works

Secular works

 
Click here to search for this composer on CPDL

Publications

B. Nelson & O. Rees (eds), Cristóbal de Morales: Sources, Influences, Reception (Woodbridge, 2007)

External links